Monday, February 18, 2019

Job Analysis Part 5

  • Collection
    • The respondent is requested to describe an incident (usually within the last twelve months) which they did or did not meet their business objective
    • They are then asked to describe the background to the incident
  • Collection
    • The respondent is then asked to describe whether what they did was effective or what was ineffective
    • The respondent is then asked for an indication as to when the incident occurred
  • Collection - Record Sheet
  • Analysis & Categorization
  • Themes are identified that are represented by the incidents
  • Other individuals are then requested to sort these incidents into content dimensions
  • Translation exercises then help to identify incidents that represent different dimensions of the behavior under consideration
  • Interpreting & Reporting
  • These dimensions are then reported based on the purpose of the analysis
  • Critical Incident Technique
  • Advantages
    • Very Flexible
    • Identification of Important Task Components
    • Identification of Training Needs
  • Critical Incident Technique
    • Disadvantages
    • Time Consuming
    • Incompleteness
    • Expert Analysis Required
Until next time...

 




Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/

Thursday, February 14, 2019

Job Analysis Part 4

  • What is a Critical Incident?
  • A Critical Incident:
    • “The incident must occur in a situation where the purpose or intent of the act seems fairly clear to the observer and where its consequences are sufficiently definite concerning its effects”
  • Critical Incident Technique
  • General Aims & Objectives
  • Identification of the Specific Aim of the Analysis
  • Decide whether Observed Behavior relates to the Specific Aim
  • Planning
  • Determine who will Perform the Observations
    • Familiarity with the Activity Observed (e g , Supervisors)
  • Training
    • Activity & Requirements
  • Planning
  • Groups
    • Location & Time
    • Person & Conditions
  • Behaviors
    • Type of Activity & Behaviors
    • Relevance & Importance to General Aim
Until next time...

 




Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/

Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Job Analysis Part 3

  • Observation - Three Main Forms
    • Direct Observation
    • Behavior Observation
    • The Observation Interview
  • Direct Observation
    • Choose the Job Category that you wish to analyses
    • Record Everything
  • Direct Observation
    • Advantages
      • Provides a moderate overview to what a job involves
      • Reference Documentation
    • Disadvantages
      • No indication of the importance of any task
      • Not informative on the level of task difficulty
  • Behavior Observation
      • More specific than direct observation in that it primarily designed to examine the behavior of the jobholder than particular content areas
    • Checklist driven outlining critical behaviors to be observed by the analyst
  • Behavior Observation - The Checklist
    • Categories of behavior to include:
      • Meaningfulness to the jobholder being observed
      • Degree of Differentiation - distinct behavior categories
      • Potential for Change - the extent to which the behavior can be changed in the future through interventions
      • Observability - the ability to reliably observe the behavior
      • End-driven - the behavior observed should directly relate to the achievement of the purpose of the task performed
  • Behavior Observation - Advantages
    • Provides a moderate overview to what a job involves
    • Reference Documentation
  • Behavior Observation - Disadvantages
    • No indication of the importance of any task
    • Not informative on the level of task difficulty
  • The Observation Interview
    • Mix between direct observation and interview
    • Analyst takes notes or directly asks the jobholder for more information  or clarification on aspects of the task that they are performing
  • The Observation Interview
    • Advantages
      • Provides a more detailed overview to what a job involves
      • Better indication of the importance of any task and level of task difficulty
    • Disadvantages
      • Analyst may require training
      • Switching between approaches may limit the quality of the data being collected
Until next time...

 




Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/

Wednesday, February 6, 2019

Job Analysis Part 2

  • Duties & Tasks
    • Base units of a job is the performance of specific tasks
      • Frequency
      • Skill
      • Complexity
      • Duration
  • Relationships & Requirements
    • Need for Supervision
    • Knowledge/Skills/Abilities
    • Need for Training
    • Minimum Requirements for the Performance of the Task
  • Tools & Equipment
    • Relationship between the performance of a task and the tools and equipment being employed to perform the task successfully
    • State of Equipment
    • Availability of Tools
    • Protective Clothing
  • Environment
    • Working Conditions
    • Legislation
    • Hazardous Material
  • Job Analysis Interview
  • Structured Interview
    • Definite Set of Prepared Questions
    • Set the Purpose of the Interview
    • Pre-set Questions follow the sequence of activities with which the jobholder’s performs
    • Probing Questions by Interviewer to Expand
  • Un-Structured Interview
    • No Set of Prepared Questions
    • Set the Purpose of the Interview
    • Ask Interviewee About the Job they Perform
    • Probing Questions by Interviewer to Expand
  • Advantages
    • Very Flexible
    • Not Necessarily Job or Task Dependent
    • Convenient
    • Provides a good overall understanding of a particular job or task
  • Disadvantages
    • Some Interviewer Training Involved
    • Interviewer may not appreciate the sensitivity of some of the information discussed
    • Cannot be used effectively for new jobs
    • Problems arise in data collation
Until next time...

 




Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/

Monday, February 4, 2019

Job Analysis Part 1

Job Analysis is the process of examining a job in detail in order to identify its component tasks. The detail and approach may vary according to the purpose for which the job is being analyzed.
  • Job Descriptions & Classifications
  • Selection Procedures
    • Job Duties to be performed by candidates
    • Minimum Education Requirements
    • Interview Questions
    • Use of Selection Tests
  • Worker Mobility
    • Identification of skill levels to perform a particular task
    • Identification of skill levels present within existing workforce
    • Development of Task-Person Fit Model
  • Training & Development
    • Identification of skill levels
    • Measure the effectiveness of training interventions
    • Identify training methods to be employed
      •   Small Group
      •   On-the-Job Training
      •   Computer Based
  • Compensation
    • Skill Levels
    • Compensable Job Factors
    • Roles & Responsibilities
  • Performance Management
    • Identification of clear goals and objectives
    • Performance Metrics and Standards
    • Evaluation Criteria
  • Job Analysis Methodologies
  • Four Main Types of Job Analysis
  • Data Collected
Until next time...

 




Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/

Monday, December 24, 2018

Happy New Year! Set SMART Goals for 2019!

Rather than "recycling" past New Year's Resolutions, set SMART goals and achieve them in 2019.  Click HERE for a template to get you started.

Our very best wishes for a happy, healthy, and successful 2019.

Until next time...







Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/

Tuesday, December 18, 2018

Change Leadership Part 4

Re-Balancing The Equilibrium
Lewin argues that the most appropriate way to support the re-balancing the equilibrium is to:


  • Strengthen the Driving Forces
    Make sure that the argument or the case that you present as a change leader is valid and backed up with facts
  • Weaken the Restraining Forces
    Creating trust will help soften the change.  
Often, it is a combination of both styles that will need to be employed to introduce change. Remember, people tend to resist change when it is forced upon them. 

Until next time...







Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/