Friday, February 24, 2017

Keeping Score on Organizational Goals 4

Steps in Keeping Score:
  1. Identify your team's most important key result areas.
  2. Select units of measure in each key result area
  3. Assess current performance in each key result area.
  4. Set goals to make improvements.
Step 1: Identify Key Result Areas (KRA's)
The first step in scorekeeping is to identify the key result areas most important to your team.
    These are broad categories in which you want to evaluate your team's success.
    They are qualitative as opposed to quantitative.
    They should be aligned to the strategy and goals of the larger organization.
    They generally fall into one of the following four categories:
 
Quality (examples)
  • Customer
  • On-time delivery
  • Accuracy
  • Defects 
Internal operations (examples)
  • Rate of production 
  • Cycle time
  • Employee satisfaction
  • Safety
Development (examples)
  • Product innovation
  • Employee empowerment
  • Process improvement
Finances (examples)
  • Profitability
  • Costs
  • ROI
What are your team's most important key result areas?
 
Begin by reviewing the strategy and direction of your team as well as the goals and objectives of the larger organization of which you are a part, then talk together with your team members to identify what is working and what is not working for your team.  Next, identify the key result areas (KRA's) most important to your success.  List each key result area and then note why it is important. Click here for a template which you can use to list what is working, what is not working, and your KRA's.

Until next time...






Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Keeping Score on Organizational Goals 3

Step 2: Establish Units of Measure
  • Units of Measure are specific ways of knowing how you’re doing in each Key Result Area
  • They translate KRA’s into numbers
  • Quality is an example that must be converted into measures
  • There is not a single unit of measure for everyone 
As you develop your own team's measures, you should answer each of the following questions to ensure that you understand them and know how you personally contribute to them.
 
Criteria for Units of Measure:
  • Unit: How is the KRA measured?
  • Source: From where is the metric obtained?
  • Frequency: How often is it measured?
  • Feedback: How and to whom is it communicated? 
Example for a call center that is measuring average response time per call:
  • KRA: Response Time
  • Metric: Minutes on Hold
  • Source: Call Center
  • Frequency: Random: 20% of Calls
  • Feedback: Team, Manager, Trainer
Keep in mind that a team should not identify key result areas independently, but instead they should be decided within the context of the direction of the organization as a whole.  This sometimes means that a team's key result areas have already been prescribed by the larger organization.  If that is the case, it is still important for team members to understand and "own" them.

Until next time...






Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/  

Friday, February 17, 2017

Keeping Score on Organizational Goals 2

Steps in Keeping Score:
  1. Identify your team's most important key result areas.
  2. Select units of measure in each key result area
  3. Assess current performance in each key result area.
  4. Set goals to make improvements.
Step 1: Identify Key Result Areas (KRA's)
The first step in scorekeeping is to identify the key result areas most important to your team.
    These are broad categories in which you want to evaluate your team's success.
    They are qualitative as opposed to quantitative.
    They should be aligned to the strategy and goals of the larger organization.
    They generally fall into one of the following four categories:
 
Quality (examples)
  • Customer
  • On-time delivery
  • Accuracy
  • Defects 
Internal operations (examples)
  • Rate of production 
  • Cycle time
  • Employee satisfaction
  • Safety
Development (examples)
  • Product innovation
  • Employee empowerment
  • Process improvement
Finances (examples)
  • Profitability
  • Costs
  • ROI
What are your team's most important key result areas?
 
Begin by reviewing the strategy and direction of your team as well as the goals and objectives of the larger organization of which you are a part, then talk together with your team members to identify what is working and what is not working for your team.  Next, identify the key result areas (KRA's) most important to your success.  List each key result area and then note why it is important. Click here for a template which you can use to list what is working, what is not working, and your KRA's.

Until next time...






Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/  

Monday, February 13, 2017

Keeping Score on Organizational Goals

What is the most important factor in a team's success?

A clear and elevating goal!

Research has shown that teams who are successful have clear and compelling goals which become a performance challenge to team members.

It is not only important to have clear and compelling goals, but people must also know how well they are doing in attaining those goals.  Imagine that you go to a basketball game of your favorite team and the announcer says at the start of the game, "Folks, we've decided tonight that we won't keep score.  This game has become too competitive and we want you to sit back and have fun watching the game and enjoying the athleticism of the players!" How would you feel?

People like to know how they're doing. Much of the appeal of sporting events and games would be lost if we did not know the score.

Keeping Score has Three Benefits:
1.  It motivates individual performance
2.  It becomes the basis for analyzing and making improvements.
3.  It helps team members to focus on a common purpose and work together.

Unfortunately, many teams and organizations do not do a good job of keeping score and so lose out on these benefits.

Keeping Score:
  • Is how we know how well we are doing
  • Must include several complementary measures
  • Must be linked to the strategy and objectives of the larger organization
  • Must be "owned" by the team
Until next time...






Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/  

Friday, January 13, 2017

Consequences of Poor Leadership

What happens when supervisors and managers fail to lead their employees effectively?
  • Low employee morale
  • Loss of respect from superiors
  • Low productivity
  • Legal ramifications
  • Poor individual performance
  • Negative career impact
  • Lack of organizational trust
Remember to identify the competencies that are necessary for effective supervision and put a plan in place to improve your skill levels. It’s also important to assess your individual strengths and opportunities for improvement and focus on your individual professional development. Leadership ability doesn’t happen overnight.  It is incremental, and skills develop over time with experience and willingness to learn.

Until next time...






Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/

Thursday, January 5, 2017

Triumph Over Emotional Challenges: Persuasion and Empathy

Persuasion and Empathy
A key to Emotional Intelligence is the ability to understand another's perspective and be able to persuade others to adopt our viewpoints.  We all see the world differently as we have different backgrounds, experiences, education.  Putting yourself "in another's shoes" is not easy.  Think about how someone may view a situation differently than you do. 

Have you seen the "Old Woman/Young Woman" diagram?  Click here to view.  What do you see?  An old woman?  A young woman?  Both? 

It is possible for you to see one thing and for someone else to see something different, yet both of you can be right!  Think about perspective when you are communicating and persuading.  How can you look at the situation differently?  Bring your team together and discuss perspective.  Have one or more team members choose a topic and try to convince the rest of the team to adopt his/her viewpoint.  What challenges come up?  How can the individual and the team overcome them?

Fun with Negativity 
  1. Discuss the consequences of being negative.  Being negative can be a way of resisting reality.  When we learn to accept the realities of our lives that are challenging, they no longer have the power to dominate and make us miserable.  We can free ourselves to be positive.    
  2. Have a contest to see who can be the most negative!  Have volunteers act out being negative.   
  3. Encourage the volunteers to exaggerate.  The observers applaud each volunteer.  The volunteer with the loudest applause wins.  
  4. Discuss ways to find the positive aspects of our realities.  
  5. Repeat the contest with the same volunteers, this time asking them to act out the same situations, being as positive as possible.
Until next time...







Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/

Tuesday, December 20, 2016

Triumph Over Emotional Challenges: Build Positive Reinforcement

Build Positive Reinforcement
Repetitive thoughts can influence our behavior on a daily basis.  It is often easy to "make mountains out of molehills" and see the negative in situations.   When the negative thoughts start creeping in, put a stop to them!  Imagine yourself squashing those thoughts as you would a mosquito that was about to bite you.  Think about those ongoing voices in your head.  What do they say?  How can you change them to be more positive?  Imagine yourself full of confidence, succeeding at everything you try.  Keep those positive thoughts going.
 
Celebrating small successes can help to reinforce positive interactions in the future.  Get your team members together and brainstorm the positive things each has done for each other and for the team.  Celebrate each success, however big or small.  Come up with ways to increase those successes day after day, week after week.   Get together on a regular basis and repeat this activity.
    

Team Strengths Exercise:    
  • Have each team member choose a partner who he/she knows fairly well.  
  • Each individual makes a list of the strengths of the partner.  
  • Partners discuss strengths with each other, reinforcing positive behaviors.  
  • Partners discuss how each of their strengths may be able to complement the other's. 
  • Team comes together as a whole and each partner reads the list he/she has written.  
  • Team celebrates their strengths together.
Until next time...







Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/