Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Leadership and Delegation: Essential Steps Part 2


WHAT DO LEADERS NEED TO DELEGATE EFFECTIVELY?

Leaders must have confidence and trust in their team members and their abilities in order to give them responsibility for tasks and projects.  Leaders must also ensure that team members receive the necessary training, guidance, resources, and authorization to do the job.  Team member readiness for a task is also crucial.

TASKS TO DELEGATE
  • Routine Jobs
  • Tasks that others can do or learn as well or better than you
  • Tasks that will challenge and develop staff
TASKS NOT TO DELEGATE
  • Confidential Matters
  • Employee Appraisals
  • Disciplinary Matters
  • Rewards and Recognition
Until next time...






Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Leadership and Delegation: Essential Steps Part 1

WHAT IS DELEGATION?
Delegation is the social skill required by leaders to effectively and efficiently empower team members to obtain organizational objectives.

BENEFITS OF DELEGATION
  • Increased team involvement
  • Increased responsibility and ownership
  • Utilize specialized knowledge and skill
  • Increase in team and organizational effectiveness
  • Ascertain suitability for future roles
WHY DON'T ALL LEADERS DELEGATE EFFECTIVELY?
Many supervisors and managers were promoted to their current position simply because they were good at their old jobs. Now they are faced with managing employees, but often they are not trained to do so.  When faced with the pressure of getting work done, many times, it can seem easier to just do it themselves rather than taking the time to train their employees. The busier the manager is, the more difficult it is to find the time to train others. This sets up a pattern that is difficult to break.

Other reasons for not delegating include:
  • Fear of loosing control
  • Fear that others may do a better job
  • Lack of confidence in team members
Until next time...






Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/

Thursday, June 29, 2017

Steps to Strategic Planning Part 2

THE SIMPLEST WAY TO THINK OF STRATEGIC PLANNING IS WITH 3 QUESTIONS:

1. Where are we now?
  • List each area and current performance, then ask the following questions for each:
    • What is working?
      • Observation
      • How can we do even better in this area?
    • What is not working?
      • Observation
      • Root Cause
      • Resolution 
2. Where do we want to go?
  • What is our mission and our vision?
  • What are our main goals?
    • Time-Frame
    • Measurement
    • Priority
  • What are our strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT Analysis)? 
3. How will we get there?
  • What should we:
    • Stop doing?
    • Start doing?
    • Continue doing?
  • What do we need in order to achieve these goals?
    • Staffing
    • Training
    • Other
    • Resources
  • What are the specific tasks to be performed to reach these goals?
    • Due date
    • Responsible
ONCE A STRATEGIC PLAN IS PUT IN PLACE, REMEMBER TO EVALUATE IT PERIODICALLY.

Strive for continuous improvement, and be prepared to make adjustments as changes occur in the organization as well as in the business environment.

Until next time...






Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Steps to Strategic Planning Part 1


WHAT IS STRATEGIC PLANNING?
Let's start with the current Wikipedia definition:  "Strategic planning is an organization's process of defining its strategy, or direction, and making decisions on allocating its resources to pursue this strategy.  It may also extend to control mechanisms for guiding the implementation of the strategy. Strategic planning became prominent in corporations during the 1960s and remains an important aspect of strategic management."
 
WHY DO WE NEED STRATEGIC PLANNING?
Organizations are constantly changing as is the world around us. Those changes can include market conditions, technology, political and legislative conditions, new opportunities, and evolving customer needs.

Strategic Planning:
  • Sets direction for the organization
    • Where the organization is headed
    • Short- and long-term performance targets
    • Actions for management and staff to achieve outcomes
  • Allows managers and staff to understand and work towards this direction
  • Focuses effort
  • Defines the organization
  • Provides consistency
  • Ensures resources and energies are allocated properly
Strategic Planning must include consideration for:
  • Operating the Business
  • The Organization’s Competitive Position
  • Meeting Customer’s Needs & Expectations
  • Achieving Performance Targets
Until next time...






Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Critical Elements of Strategy Part 3

To begin thinking about critical strategic questions and become clearer about what you know and don't know about your organization strategy, ask yourself the following questions:
  1. How does our strategy give us competitive advantage for the future?
  2. What is the core ideology that describes who we are and what we are about?
  3. What are our 3 top business objectives for this year?
Here are the steps of the strategic design sequence that we will discuss in the future:
  • Analyze the business environment
  • Forecast the future
  • Create a core ideology
  • Define strategic direction
  • Define competitive advantage
  • Set goals
  • Create a master plan
 Until next time...






Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Critical Elements of Strategy Part 2

THREE APPROACHES

1. Internally-Driven:
  • Most businesses are internally-driven.
  • This means that their strategy is driven by what they have done in the past.
  • Their thinking is from the inside out – they decide what to make, how to make it, and then how to get customers to buy it.
  • The weakness of this strategy is that organization members are not anticipating changes in the marketplace and so fail to be adaptive and innovative. This results in the buggy-whip syndrome in which they keep making buggy whips, which they are good at, in an era of automobiles.

2. Customer-Driven:
  • Organizations that are customer-driven try to develop a business strategy by "being close" and "listening" to the customer.
  • They ask the same questions as the internally-driven organization: "What products should we make and sell?"  However, now they want the customer to answer these questions.
  • The consequence of trying to be to customer-driven is that these companies end up trying to be "all things to all people."  They fail to link what they do to their core competencies, how they want to differentiate themselves from their competitors, or how they add value as an organization.

3. Market-Driven:

  • This strategy is based on making conscious choices about which markets organizations will serve and how they add value to their customers.
  • They seek to differentiate themselves from their competitors by identifying the specific benefits they will or will not provide and organizing around the delivery of those benefits.
  • This is not the same as asking customers for their input and feedback. It is based on making decisions about how they want to compete.
We believe that it is through a market-driven strategy that organizations will best compete in the present and plan for their future.

Until next time...






Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Critical Elements of Strategy Part 1

In today's dynamic and rapidly changing world, organizations need a dynamic business strategy that anticipates change in the marketplace .  Although some industries are more stable than others, the organizations that flourish in the long run are those who engage in continual strategic renewal.

ELEMENTS OF STRATEGY
  • Strategy is a synonym for conscious choices.
  • It addresses the interface between the organization and its environment
  • It lays the foundation for tomorrow success while competing to win today.
  • It involves anticipating, adapting, and creating change.
  • It is the most important and difficult challenge facing businesses today.
  • It requires trade-offs (can't be all things to all people)
  • It includes differentiating oneself from competitors.
  • It necessitates risk taking.
  • It is the task of the whole organization.
  • It must be operationalized into plans and actions.
TWO ORIENTATIONS

Preserving:
  • Reacting to changes in environment
  • Protecting stable domain
  • Looking to the past
  • Doing things the same
  • Playing catch up
  • Feeling anxious
Renewing:
  • Anticipating changes in environment
  • Seeking new opportunities
  • Looking to the future
  • Innovating
  • Being in front
  • Feeling hopeful