Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Managing Difficult People Part 1

One of the aspects of managing conflict is identifying difficult people who contribute to conflict. To successfully manage conflict, HR professionals and managers need to learn how to deal with difficult people. In this course, we learned about types of difficult people and strategies for preventing and managing conflict with difficult people.

Types of Difficult People
  • The Steamroller
  • The Nitpicker
  • The Obstructionist
  • The I-Didn’t-Sign-Up-for-That
  • The Gossipmonger
  • The Defeatist
  • The Slacker
  • The Faultfinder
  • The Whiner
  • The Martyr
  • The Self-Criticizer
  • The Blamer
  • The Handle-With-Care
  • The Microscope
General Coping Strategies
  • Recognize that an attitude problem exists
  • Acknowledge any underlying causes for the negative attitude.
  • Help the difficult person take responsibility.
  • Replace negative, inappropriate reactions with different, more acceptable ones.
  • Instill positive attitudes in others.
Until next time...






Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Listening, Learning & Improving Part 3

Performance Appraisals

Positive Framing is Dependent Upon
  • Tone and Pitch
  • Body language
  • Language
  • Structure of the sentence
If There Is Disagreement
  • Listen to the Employee’s Opinion
  • Assess Any New Information as Appropriate
  • Should the Employee not Agree to sign the Appraisal - document this fact
  • The Employee can choose to add an addendum or rebuttal - this should be signed also by your manager and HR representative
  • Sign and date the Appraisal including any rebuttals
Constructive Criticism
  • Collect the evidence
  • Ration the criticism so that it will be effective
  • Prioritize the criticism
  • Avoid going over old ground
  • Balance between criticism and praise
  • Compartmentalize the criticism
Receiving Criticism
The appraisal process may offer the employee a chance to criticize you as a manager so you need to be able to take criticism as well.
  • Listen to the critic, then repeat back the criticism
  • Ask the critic to specify the problem
  • Search for a solution to the problem
To remove or prevent problems in the appraisal process, the organization can:
  • Design the performance appraisal process to suit the requirements of the organization
  • Provide an appropriate level of support
  • Provide the required structures
  • Ensure that those involved in performance appraisal are capable through training
  • Set objectives and communicate them so that they can be used to drive the performance appraisal process
  • Communicate and highlight the value of the performance appraisal process across the organization
  • Ensure that the process is seen as a transparent and open process designed to assist people as opposed to blame or hinder them
  • Link the process to the proactive development of personnel
Remember that preparation and good communication skills are vital.  Clear and positive language is required.  Appraisal is a two-way process!

Until next time...






Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Listening, Learning & Improving Part 2

Performance Appraisals

The Performance Appraisal Discussion

Actively Listen

  • Don’t interrupt!
  • Do Clarify
  • Do Paraphrase
  • Do Problem-Solve
There should be no surprises!
  • Regular performance meetings with employees will ensure that surprises are avoided
The Performance Appraisal Discussion
  • Make sure that it is a discussion and not a lecture!
  • Make sure that the employee participates
  • Make sure that there is clarity in terms of the issues discussed and the action points that come out of them
  • Get Signed Agreement on the Appraisal and on any action plans
Positive Framing is Dependent Upon
  • Tone and Pitch
  • Body language
  • Language
  • Structure of the sentence
If There Is Disagreement
  • Listen to the Employee’s Opinion
  • Assess Any New Information as Appropriate
  • Should the Employee not Agree to sign the Appraisal - document this fact
  • The Employee can choose to add an addendum or rebuttal - this should be signed also by your manager and HR representative
  • Sign and date the Appraisal including any rebuttals
Until next time...






Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/

Thursday, April 5, 2018

Listening, Learning & Improving Part 1

Performance Appraisals

Appraiser Role
  • Information Provider
  • Encouraging
  • Advising
  • Clarifying problems
  • Questioning
  • Seeking Agreement
  • Summarizing
Appraisal Fundamentals
Do
  • Focus on Behavior
  • Be Specific
  • Be Sincere
  • Be Honest
  • Consider Your Timing
  • Seeking Agreement
  • Check For Understanding
Don't
  • Blame or Attack
  • Offer Unsubstantiated or Unsupported Feedback
  • Become Emotional or Reactive
  • Label or Judge the Employee
Encourage High Self-Esteem
Do
  • Make positive comments
  • Display acceptance
  • Reduce negative feelings
  • Share experiences
  • Indicate understanding and empathy
Don't
  • Devalue the person
  • Use negative verbal and non-verbal behaviors (e g , sigh)
  • Show impatience
  • Be condescending
Until next time...






Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/

Tuesday, April 3, 2018

Process, Benefits & Preparation Part 4

Performance Appraisals

Writing the Performance Appraisal
  • Review the employee’s performance over the last year and your file of past performance discussions
  • Identify in particular areas for praise and also areas for improvement
  • Ensure completeness
  • Make sure the documents are clearly written and used in a way to encourage the employee’s participation
  • Be Specific
  • Outline Major Accomplishments of the Past Year
  • Illustrate how they supported the overall success of the team/company
  • Select areas for improvement and show how they impacted on this year’s performance
  • Give Examples
  • Quantify
When writing the appraisal documents, it is important to:
  • Note Key Strengths
  • Key Areas in which the employee excels
  • Describe areas of strength
  • Note Areas of Development
  • Areas of Growth & Improvement
  • Skills/Competencies to be developed
  • Summarize Overall Performance Effectiveness
  • Describe overall effectiveness in terms of team and organization
Remember that the documents that you prepare can be brought up for scrutiny if the employee appeals the appraisal. This means that there is a requirement for a high level of care to be exhibited when completing the documents and that facts are used, not opinions
Until next time...






Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/

Thursday, March 29, 2018

Process, Benefits & Preparation Part 3

Performance Appraisals

Performance Appraisal Areas
In the Performance Appraisal process, the main areas of concentration will be:


Performance (What)
  • Job responsibilities/duties
  • Accountabilities
  • Business targets
  • Key performance indicators (KPI’s)
  • Objectives
  • Key result areas
Skills and Knowledge (How)
  • Technical
  • Managerial
  • Interpersonal
  • Professional
  • Business
  • Product/Service
Preparation
To make sure that the Performance Appraisal goes well, advance preparation is essential.
Preparation includes:
  • Information gathering: Collect all relevant information, not just what will confirm your own views!
  • Documentation
  • Make sure that both you and the employee have completed the Performance Appraisal documents correctly.
Location for Performance Appraisal
  • Somewhere quiet and private. Make sure phones are off, and put a ‘Do not disturb’ sign on the door.
Scheduling a time
  • Put it on your calendar and block it from interruptions.
Until next time...






Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Process, Benefits & Preparation Part 2

Performance Apprasisals

Supervisor’s Role and Benefits from Performance Management
The supervisor's role within the process can be defined as:

  • Setting objectives with employee
  • Managing rewards and ensuring fair compensation for the level of job performance
  • Offering accurate, timely, regular and specific feedback
  • Through effective Performance Appraisals, supervisors can
  • Translate business goals into individual job objectives and standards
  • Monitor performance and offer feedback
  • Communicate and seek agreement on objectives
  • Coach employees on how to achieve their performance objectives
  • Identify employees’ strengths and weaknesses
  • Generate and agree on development plans to best serve the organization and individual needs  
Employee’s Role and Benefits from Performance Management
The employee’s role in the process includes:
  • Set objectives with supervisor
  • Improve performance
  • Plan his/her development
Through Performance Appraisals, employees can:
  • Openly discuss performance with supervisors
  • Reinforce and sustain good performance
  • Improve performance where needed
  • Determine career-progression goals
  • Identify development and training needs
  • Link rewards to performance
Until next time...






Sheryl Tuchman, SPHR, SHRM-SCP
http://tools2succeed.com/